Ebooklet -Avascular Necrosis-2016

Rare Disease Day 28 February 2019

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Facts

Osteonecrosis – Avascular Necrosis -Aseptic Necrosis-Ischemic Necrosis-Bone Infarction- has many different names and causes.In children its Legg Calves Perthes.

They all mean – A Loss of blood supply to the bone  which may lead to bone cell death and can be caused by an injury (meniscal tear -bone fracture or joint dislocation; called traumatic osteonecrosis).

There may be no history of injury (non-traumatic osteonecrosis); however, other risk factors are associated with the disease such as some medications (steroids, also known as corticosteroids), alcohol usage or blood coagulation disorders. Increased pressure within the bone also is associated with osteonecrosis.

One theory is that the pressure within the bone causes the blood vessels to narrow, making it difficult for blood to circulate through the bone. Osteonecrosis can also be associated with other disorders. The exact reason osteonecrosis develops is not fully understood for some risk factors.

rareday2019avn

Sometimes, osteonecrosis occurs in people with no risk factors (idiopathic). Some people have multiple risk factors. Osteonecrosis most likely develops because of the combination of factors, possibly including genetic, metabolic, self-imposed (alcohol, smoking), and other diseases that you may have and their treatment.

Injury:

When a joint any joint hip,knee, shoulder, ankle, elbow is injured, as in a fracture or dislocation, meniscus tear the blood vessels may be damaged.

This can interfere with the blood circulation to the bone and lead to trauma-related osteonecrosis.

Studies suggest that this type of osteonecrosis may develop in more than 20% of people who dislocate their hip joint.

Corticosteroid Medications:

Corticosteroids, such as prednisone, are commonly used to treat diseases in which there is inflammation, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and vasculitis. Studies suggest that long-term, high dose systemic (oral or intravenous) corticosteroid use is a major risk factor for non-traumatic osteonecrosis with reports of up to 35 percent of all people with non-traumatic osteonecrosis.

And corticosteroids come in many versions – inhaled and ingested corticosteroids for asthma-cold-sinus problems or steroid injections into joints, topical for skin-

Patients should discuss concerns about corticosteroid use with their doctor.

Doctors aren’t sure exactly why the use of corticosteroids sometimes is associated with osteonecrosis. They may have negative effects on different organs and tissues within the body. For example, they may interfere with the body’s ability to build new bones and to break down fatty substances.

These substances would then build up in and clog the blood vessels, causing them to narrow. This then would reduce the ability of blood to flow inside a bone.

Alcohol Use:

Excessive alcohol use is another major risk factor for non-traumatic osteonecrosis. Studies have reported that alcohol accounts for about 30% of all people with non-traumatic osteonecrosis. While alcohol can slow down bone remodeling (the balance between forming new bone and removing bone), it is not known why or how alcohol can trigger osteonecrosis.

Other Risk Factors:

Other risk factors or conditions associated with non-traumatic osteonecrosis include Gaucher disease, pancreatitis, autoimmune disease, cancer, HIV infection, decompression disease (Caisson disease), and blood disorders such as sickle cell disease. Certain medical treatments including radiation treatments and chemotherapy can cause osteonecrosis. People who have received a kidney or other organ transplant may also have an increased risk.

Affected Populations

Osteonecrosis usually affects people between 30 and 50 years of age; about 10,000 to 20,000 people develop osteonecrosis each year in the United States.

Osteonecrosis affects both men and women and affects people of all ages. It is most common among people in their thirties and forties.

Depending on a person’s risk factors and whether the underlying cause is trauma, it also can affect younger or older people.

Related Disorders

Some Symptoms of the disorders listed below may be similar to those of osteonecrosis. Comparisons may be useful for a differential diagnosis:

Osteopetrosis is a combination of several rare genetically caused symptoms grouped together as one disorder. It can be inherited and is marked by increased bone density, brittle bones, and, in some people, skeletal abnormalities. Although symptoms may not initially be apparent to people with mild forms of this disorder, trivial injuries may cause bone fractures due to abnormalities of the bone. The dominantly transmitted form is milder than the recessive form and may not be diagnosed until adolescence or adulthood when symptoms first appear. More serious complications occur in the recessive form which may be diagnosed from examination of skeletal x-rays during infancy or childhood. (For more information on this disorder, choose “Osteopetrosis” as your search term in the Rare Disease Database.)

Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS), also known as complex regional pain syndrome, is a rare disorder of the sympathetic nervous system that is characterized by chronic and severe pain. The sympathetic nervous system is that part of the autonomic nervous system that regulates involuntary functions of the body such as increasing heart rate, constricting blood vessels, and increasing blood pressure. Excessive or abnormal responses of portions of the sympathetic nervous system are thought to be responsible for the pain associated with reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome. The symptoms of RSDS typically begin with burning pain, especially in an arm, finger(s), palm of the hand(s), and/or shoulder(s). In some individuals, RSDS may occur in one or both legs or it may be localized to one knee or hip. Frequently, RSDS may be misdiagnosed as a painful nerve injury. The skin over the affected area(s) may become swollen (edema) and inflamed. Affected skin may be extremely sensitive to touch and to hot or cold temperatures (cutaneous hypersensitivity). The affected limb(s) may perspire excessively and be warm to the touch (vasomotor instability). The exact cause of RSDS is not fully understood, although it may be associated with injury to the nerves, trauma, surgery, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, infection, or radiation therapy. (For more information on this disorder, choose “reflex sympathetic dystrophy” as your search term in the Rare Disease Database.)

Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD) is one of a group of disorders known as the osteochondroses. The osteochondroses typically are characterized by degeneration and subsequent regeneration of the growing end of a bone (epiphyses). In LCPD, the growing end of the upper portion of the thigh bone (femur) is affected. The upper section of the thigh bone is known as the head or “the ball” and connects to the hip in a depression or “socket”. This is the hip joint, which is a ball and socket joint. The disorder results from an unexplained interruption of the blood supply (ischemia) to the head of the femur, which causes degeneration and deformity of the femoral head. Symptoms may include a limp with or without pain in the hip, knee, thigh, and/or groin; muscle spasms; and/or limited or restricted movement of the affected hip. The disease process seems to be self-limiting as new blood supplies are established (revascularization) and new healthy bone forms (re-ossifies) in the affected area. The exact cause for the temporary interruption of blood flow to the femoral epiphysis is not fully understood. Most times the disorder appears to occur randomly for no apparent reason (sporadically).

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Osteonecrosis-Avascular Necrosis -Broken Down

Osteonecrosis is the death of a segment of bone caused by an impaired blood supply. We all need an adequate blood supply to the bone other wise the bone can collapse and die. The blood supply to bone is delivered to the endosteal cavity by nutrient arteries, then flows through marrow sinusoids before exiting via numerous small vessels that ramify through the cortex. Reductions in vascular supply are associated with bone loss. Bones in our body are living tissue. They have their own blood vessels and are made of living cells, which help them to grow and to repair themselves. As well, proteins, minerals and vitamins make up the bone when you get to little blood flow the bone breaksdown much faster than it can repair and generate new bone.

This disorder can be caused by an injury or can occur spontaneously.

Typical symptoms include pain, limited range of motion of the affected joint, and, when the leg is affected, a limp.

The diagnosis is based on symptoms, the person’s risk of osteonecrosis, and the results of x-rays and magnetic resonance imaging.

Stopping smoking, stopping excessive alcohol use, and minimizing the use of or lowering the dose of corticosteroids reduce the risk of developing the disorder.

Various surgical procedures can be done if nonsurgical measures (such as rest, physical therapy, and pain relievers) do not relieve symptoms. Eat a healthy diet

Each year in the United States, about 20,000 people develop osteonecrosis. The hip is most commonly affected, followed by the knee and shoulder. The wrist and ankle are affected less often. Osteonecrosis does not usually affect the shoulder or other less commonly affected sites unless the hip is also affected. However, osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is a disorder involving only the jaw bone.
Causes

Osteonecrosis is not a specific disease but a condition in which death of the bone is confined to one or more specific (localized) areas. There are two general categories of osteonecrosis:Making it a rare disorder.

Traumatic (following an injury)

Nontraumatic

Traumatic osteonecrosis is the most common. The most frequent cause of traumatic osteonecrosis is a displaced fracture. In a displaced fracture, a bone breaks into two or more parts and moves so that the fractured ends are not lined up. The type of displaced fracture that causes osteonecrosis most often affects the hip (see Hip Fractures) and most commonly occurs in older people.

Another cause of traumatic osteonecrosis is a dislocation. A dislocation occurs when the ends of bones in joints become completely separated from each other, as in a hip dislocation.

A displaced fracture or a dislocation may damage the blood vessels supplying the upper end of the thighbone (the femoral head, part of the hip joint), resulting in death of this part of the bone. This death of bone occurs less often in other areas of the body.
Some Risk Factors for Osteonecrosis

Traumatic osteonecrosis- injury to bone or joint like meniscal tear -broken bones-dislocations etc…

Fractures (breaks in bones) and dislocations (when the ends of bones in joints become completely separated from each other)

Nontraumatic osteonecrosis

Excessive alcohol

Blood clotting (coagulation) disorders

Bone Marrow Edema

Chemotherapy

Corticosteroids

Cushing syndrome

Decompression sickness

Gaucher disease

High level of lipids in the blood (hyperlipidemia)

HIV infection

Liver disease

Lupus and other autoimmune connective tissue disorders

Miscellaneous conditions (such as chronic kidney disease and rare genetic mutations)

Organ transplantation

Pancreatitis

Radiation

Sickle cell disease

Smoking

Tumors

Vasculitis
Nontraumatic osteonecrosis occurs without direct trauma or injury. This type may be caused by a disease or condition that results in the blockage of small blood vessels that supply certain areas of the bone. The areas most commonly affected are the femoral head (which is part of the hip joint), the knee, and the upper arm at the shoulder. This disorder occurs most commonly among men and people between the ages of 30 and 50 and often affects both hips or both shoulders. The most common causes are

Corticosteroids (when given at high doses, for long periods of time, or both)

Chronic, excessive alcohol use (more than 3 drinks a day for several years)

A number of other causes have been identified, but these occur much less often. These other causes include certain blood-clotting disorders, sickle cell disease, liver disease, tumors, Gaucher disease, radiation therapy, and decompression sickness (which occurs in divers who surface too quickly). A number of disorders that are treated with high doses of corticosteroids (such as lupus) also may be associated with osteonecrosis. In these cases, it may not be clear whether the cause is the disorder or the corticosteroids.

In about 20% of people with osteonecrosis, the cause is unknown.

If one bone has nontraumatic osteonecrosis, the same bone on the opposite side of the body sometimes has it also, even if there are no symptoms. For example, if one hip is affected, about 60% of the time the other hip is affected.

Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK or SONK) can occur in older women (occasionally men) who have no specific risk factors for the disorder. SPONK differs from other forms of osteonecrosis. SPONK is thought to be caused by an insufficiency fracture. An insufficiency fracture is caused by normal wear and tear on bone that has been affected by osteoporosis. SPONK occurs without direct trauma or injury.
Symptoms

As osteonecrosis progresses, more and more tiny fractures may occur, particularly in bones that support weight, such as the hip. As a result, the bone usually collapses weeks or months after the blood supply is cut off. Most often pain develops gradually when the bone begins to collapse. At times, however, pain may begin suddenly and could be related to increased pressure that develops in and around the affected area of bone. Regardless of how sudden, pain is increased by moving the affected bone and typically is alleviated with rest. The person avoids moving the joint to minimize pain.

If the affected bone is in the leg, standing or walking worsens the pain and a limp develops.

In osteonecrosis of the hip, pain is usually present in the groin and may extend down the thigh or into the buttocks.

Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee causes sudden pain along the inner part of the knee. There may be tenderness in this area, and the joint often becomes swollen with excess fluid. Bending the knee may be painful, and people may have a limp.

Osteonecrosis of the shoulder often causes fewer symptoms than osteonecrosis that occurs in the hip or knee.

Osteoarthritis (damage to the cartilage covering the joint surfaces) develops over time, often after a large part of the bone collapses.
Diagnosis

X-rays

Magnetic resonance imaging

Because osteonecrosis is often painless at first, it may not be diagnosed in its earliest stages. Doctors suspect osteonecrosis in people who do not improve satisfactorily after having certain fractures. They also suspect the disorder in people who develop unexplained pain in the hip, knee, or shoulder, particularly if these people have risk factors for osteonecrosis.

X-rays of the affected area usually show osteonecrosis unless the disorder is in its earliest stages. If x-rays appear normal, however, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is usually done because it is the best test for detecting osteonecrosis early, before changes appear on ordinary x-rays. The x-rays and MRI also show whether the bone has collapsed, how advanced the disorder is, and whether the joint is affected by osteoarthritis. If doctors discover nontraumatic osteonecrosis in one hip, they also examine the other hip with an x-ray or MRI.

Blood tests may be done to detect an underlying disorder (such as a blood-clotting disorder).
Prevention

To minimize the risk of osteonecrosis caused by corticosteroids, doctors use these drugs only when essential, prescribe them in as low a dose as needed, and prescribe them for as short a duration as possible.

To prevent osteonecrosis caused by decompression sickness, people should follow accepted rules for decompression during diving and when working in pressurized environments (see prevention of decompression sickness and see Diving Safety Precautions and Prevention of Diving Injuries).

Excessive alcohol use and smoking should be avoided.

Various drugs (such as those that prevent blood clots, dilate blood vessels, or lower lipid levels) are being evaluated for prevention of osteonecrosis in people at high risk.
Treatment

Nonsurgical measures to relieve symptoms

Surgical procedures

Hip replacement

blood supply long bones

Some areas affected by osteonecrosis need only nonsurgical measures to relieve symptoms. Other areas need to be treated with a surgical procedure.
Nonsurgical measures

Several nonsurgical measures are available for treating the symptoms caused by osteonecrosis. Taking anti-inflammatory drugs or other pain relievers, minimizing activity and stress (such as weight bearing for osteonecrosis of the hip and knee), and undergoing physical therapy are ways to relieve symptoms but not cure the disorder or change its course. These measures, however, may be adequate for treatment of the shoulder, the knee, spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee, and small areas of osteonecrosis of the hip, which may spontaneously heal without treatment. Osteonecrosis heals without treatment in about 80% of people if the disorder is diagnosed early and if the affected area is small.

Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee is usually treated without surgery, and pain usually resolves.
Surgical procedures

There are a number of surgical procedures that slow or possibly prevent progression of the disorder. These procedures are done to preserve the joint and are most effective for treating early osteonecrosis, particularly of the hip, that has not yet progressed to bone collapse. If bone collapse has occurred, a type of joint replacement procedure may be done to decrease pain and improve function.

Core decompression, the simplest and most common of these procedures, involves drilling one or many small tracks or holes (perforations) into the area in an attempt to decrease pressure inside the bone. Core decompression often relieves pain and stimulates healing. In about 65% of people, the procedure can delay or prevent the need for total hip replacement. In younger people, core decompression may also be used even if a small amount of collapse already has taken place. The procedure is relatively simple, has a low rate of complications, and requires the use of crutches for about 6 weeks. Most people have satisfactory or good results overall. However, results for any particular person can be hard to predict. About 20 to 35% of people require a total hip replacement.

During core decompression, surgeons may inject a person’s own bone cells into the small hole or holes. This enhancement to the core decompression procedure may help heal the femoral head (which is part of the hip joint).

Bone grafting (transplanting bone from one site to another) is another procedure. For osteonecrosis of the hip, this can involve removing the dead area of bone and replacing it with more normal bone from elsewhere in the body. This graft supports the weakened area of bone and stimulates the body to form new, living bone in the affected area.

An osteotomy is another procedure designed to save the affected joint. This procedure is done particularly in the region of the hip and may be suitable for younger people in whom some degree of collapse already has occurred, which makes them poor candidates for core decompression or other procedures. Usually the osteonecrosis is in the weight-bearing area of the femoral head. An osteotomy changes the position of the bone so that the weight of the body is now supported by a normal area of the femoral head and not by the collapsed area.

Bone grafting and osteotomy are difficult procedures, however, and are not often done in the United States. They require a person to spend up to 6 months on crutches. These procedures are done only at selected centers that have the surgical experience and facilities to achieve the best results.

A total joint replacement is an effective procedure to relieve pain and restore motion if osteonecrosis has caused significant joint collapse and osteoarthritis. About 95% of people benefit from total replacement of the hip or knee (see Hip replacement). With modern techniques and devices, most daily activities can be resumed within 3 months and most joints should last more than 15 to 20 years.

In younger people with osteonecrosis, a total joint replacement may have to be revised (called revision surgery) or replaced at some later time. However, with modern devices, revision surgery has become much less common. Because total joint replacement is now so successful, there is much less need to do other procedures that replace part of the joint or remove the surface cartilage and place a cap on each bone end.

Occasionally, a partial or total replacement of an extremely painful knee or shoulder may be needed for advanced osteonecrosis that is not alleviated by nonsurgical treatment.
More Information

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

 

You are what you eat

Finding delicious, wholesome  food is not always easy when you’re eating out at a restaurant, but it’s totally possible when you make it at home I’m Debbie a flexitarian that eats mostly plant based and I am changing my weight and improving my health.I changed my lifestyle to help lower my inflammation and control pain but i will eat fish, chicken etc….just not everyday

Not all my recipes posted are healthy I do like a good old fashioned dinner or snack now and then but its rare.

I am a patient leader advocate and home cook

https://flexitarianforlife.wordpress.com/author/chronicallygratefuldebla/

www.ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com

 

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Avascular Necrosis-Osteonecrosis

The real term is Osteonecrosis

Synonyms of Osteonecrosis

  • aseptic necrosis
  • avascular necrosis of bone
  • ischemic necrosis of bone

What is avascular necrosis-osteonecrosis ?

AVN-ON is a disease that results from the temporary or permanent loss of blood supply to the bone.

When blood supply is cut off, the bone tissue dies and the bone collapses. If it happens near a joint, the joint surface may collapse.

This condition may happen in any bone. It most commonly happens in the ends of a long bone. It may affect one bone, several bones at one time, or different bones at different times.

What causes avascular necrosis?

Avascular necrosis – Osteonecrosis may be the result of the following:

• Injury

• Fracture

• Damage to blood vessels

• Long-term use of medicines, such as corticosteroids

•To many steroid injections

• Excessive, long-term use of alcohol

• Specific chronic medical conditions

What are the risk factors for avascular necrosis-osteonecrosis?

Risk factors include:

• Injury

• Steroid use

• Gaucher disease

• Caisson disease

• Alcohol use

• Blood disorders, such as sickle cell anemia, factor V, eNOS, mthfr, factor viii

• Radiation treatments

• Chemotherapy

• Pancreatitis

• Decompression disease

• Hypercoagulable state

• Hyperlipidemia

• Autoimmune disease

• HIV

• Vasculitis

• Bone Marrow Edema

• Legg Calves Perthes is avn in childhood

What are the symptoms of avascular necrosis?

The following are the most common symptoms of avascular necrosis. However, each person may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:

• Minimal early joint pain

• Increased joint pain as bone and joint begin to collapse

• Limited range of motion due to pain

The symptoms of avascular necrosis may look like other medical conditions or bone problems. Always talk with your healthcare provider for a diagnosis.

How is avascular necrosis treated?

Specific treatment for avascular necrosis will be determined by your healthcare provider based on:

• Your age, overall health, and medical history

• Extent of the disease

• Location and amount of bone affected

• Underlying cause of the disease

• Your tolerance for specific medicines, procedures, or therapies

• Expectations for the course of the disease

Key points about avascular necrosis

• Avascular necrosis is a disease that results from the temporary or permanent loss of blood supply to the bone. It happens most commonly in the ends of a long bone.

• Avascular necrosis may be the result of injury, use of specific medicines, or alcohol.

• Symptoms may include mild to severe joint pain and limited range of motion.

• Medications,assistive devices, new experimental treatments like Prp and stem cell injections have show great promise but usually not covered by insurance or you may need to have surgery to improve functionality or to stop further damage to the affected bone or joint.

Next steps

Tips to help you get the most from a visit to your healthcare provider:

• Know the reason for your visit and what you want to happen.

• Before your visit, write down questions you want answered.

• Bring someone with you to help you ask questions and remember what your provider tells you.

• At the visit, write down the name of a new diagnosis, and any new medicines, treatments, or tests. Also write down any new instructions your provider gives you.

• Know why a new medicine or treatment is prescribed, and how it will help you. Also know what the side effects are.

• Ask if your condition can be treated in other ways.

• Know why a test or procedure is recommended and what the results could mean.

• Know what to expect if you do not take the medicine or have the test or procedure.

• If you have a follow-up appointment, write down the date, time, and purpose for that visit.

• Know how you can contact your provider if you have questions. You’re physician should always take a few minutes to talk to you and discuss concerns, treatments all treatments not just the ones they do.

If you don’t get good communication you may want to get another opinion and consider changing providers.

Learn to be your own advocate

Your worth it.

Osteonecrosis has many different causes. Loss of blood supply to the bone may lead to bone cell death and can be caused by an injury (bone fracture or joint dislocation; called traumatic osteonecrosis). At times, there may be no history of injury (non-traumatic osteonecrosis); however, other risk factors are associated with the disease such as some medications (steroids, also known as corticosteroids), alcohol usage or blood coagulation disorders. Increased pressure within the bone also is associated with osteonecrosis. One theory is that the pressure within the bone causes the blood vessels to narrow, making it difficult for blood to circulate through the bone. Osteonecrosis can also be associated with other disorders.

The exact reason osteonecrosis develops is not fully understood for some risk factors. Sometimes, osteonecrosis occurs in people with no risk factors (idiopathic).

Some people have multiple risk factors. Osteonecrosis most likely develops because of the combination of factors, possibly including genetic, metabolic, self-imposed (alcohol, smoking), and other diseases that you may have and their treatment. 

Injury:
When a joint is injured, as in a meniscus tear, fracture or dislocation, the blood vessels may be damaged. This can interfere with the blood circulation to the bone and lead to trauma-related osteonecrosis. Studies suggest that this type of osteonecrosis may develop in more than 20% of people who dislocate their hip joint. And 15 % of people who have trauma to knee.

Corticosteroid Medications:
Corticosteroids, such as prednisone, are commonly used to treat diseases in which there is inflammation, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, copd, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and vasculitis.

Studies suggest that long-term, high dose systemic (oral or intravenous) corticosteroid use is a major risk factor for non-traumatic osteonecrosis with reports of up to 35 percent of all people with non-traumatic osteonecrosis.

However, there is still some risk of osteonecrosis associated with the infrequent use of corticosteroids, inhaled corticosteroids, or most steroid injections into joints.

Patients should discuss concerns about corticosteroid use with their doctor.

Doctors aren’t sure exactly why the use of corticosteroids sometimes is associated with osteonecrosis. They may have negative effects on different organs and tissues within the body. For example, they may interfere with the body’s ability to build new bones and to break down fatty substances.

These substances would then build up in and clog the blood vessels, causing them to narrow. This then would reduce the ability of blood to flow inside a bone.

Alcohol Use:
Excessive alcohol use is another major risk factor for non-traumatic osteonecrosis. Studies have reported that alcohol accounts for about 30% of all people with non-traumatic osteonecrosis. While alcohol can slow down bone remodeling (the balance between forming new bone and removing bone), it is not known why or how alcohol can trigger osteonecrosis.

Other Risk Factors:
Other risk factors or conditions associated with non-traumatic osteonecrosis include Gaucher disease, pancreatitis, autoimmune disease, cancer, HIV infection, decompression disease (Caisson disease), and blood disorders such as sickle cell disease, factor v, mthfr, and more so always ask your doctor to check you for a clot disorder.

Certain medical treatments including radiation treatments and chemotherapy can cause osteonecrosis. People who have received a kidney or other organ transplant may also have an increased risk.

Affected Populations

Osteonecrosis usually affects people between 20 and 50 years of age; about 10,000 to 20,000 people develop osteonecrosis each year in the United States alone.

Osteonecrosis affects both men and women and affects people of all ages. It is most common among people in their thirties and forties. Depending on a person’s risk factors and whether the underlying cause is trauma, it also can affect younger or older people.

Diagnosis

After performing a complete physical examination and asking about the patient’s medical history (for example, what health problems the patient has had and for how long), the doctor may use one or more imaging techniques to diagnose osteonecrosis. As with many other diseases, early diagnosis increases the chances of treatment success.

It is likely that the doctor first will recommend an x-ray. X-rays can help identify many causes of joint pain, such as a fracture or arthritis. If the x-ray is normal, the patient may need to have more tests.

Research studies have shown that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently the most sensitive method for diagnosing osteonecrosis in the early stages. The tests described below may be used to determine the amount of bone affected and how far the disease has progressed.

X-Ray
An x-ray is a common tool that the doctor may use to help diagnose the cause of joint pain. It is a simple way to produce pictures of bones. The x-ray of a person with early osteonecrosis is likely to be normal because x-rays are not sensitive enough to detect the bone changes in the early stages of the disease. X-rays can show bone damage in the later stages, and once the diagnosis is made, they are often used to monitor the course of the condition.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)
MRI is a common method for diagnosing osteonecrosis. Unlike x-rays, bone scans, and CT (computed/computerized tomography) scans, MRI detects chemical changes in the bone marrow and can show osteonecrosis in its earliest stages before it is seen on an x-ray. MRI provides the doctor with a picture of the area affected and the bone rebuilding process. In addition, MRI may show diseased areas that are not yet causing any symptoms. An MRI uses a magnetic field and radio waves to produce cross-sectional images of organs and bodily tissues.

Bone Scan
Also known as bone scintigraphy, bone scans should not be used for the diagnosis of osteonecrosis because they may miss 20 to 40% of the bone locations affected.

Computed/Computerized Tomography (CT)
A CT scan is an imaging technique that provides the doctor with a three-dimensional picture of the bone. It also shows “slices” of the bone, making the picture much clearer than x-rays and bone scans. CT scans usually do not detect early osteonecrosis as early as MRI scans but are the best way to show a crack in the bone. Occasionally it may be useful in determining the extent of bone or joint surface collapse.

Biopsy
A biopsy is a surgical procedure in which tissue from the affected bone is removed and studied. It is rarely used for diagnosis, as the other imaging studies are usually sufficiently distinct to make the diagnosis with a high level of confidence.

Standard Therapies

Treatment
Appropriate treatment for osteonecrosis is necessary to keep joints from collapsing. If untreated, most patients will experience severe pain and limitation in movement within two years. There is no agreed upon optimal treatment for individuals with osteonecrosis.

Early intervention is essential to preserve the joints, but most people are diagnosed late in the disease process. 

Several treatments are available that can help prevent further bone and joint damage and reduce pain. To determine the most appropriate treatment, the doctor considers the following aspects of a patient’s disease: the age of the patient; the stage of the disease–early or late; the location and amount of bone affected–a small or large area. The underlying cause has not been shown to influence outcomes of treatment.

The goal in treating osteonecrosis is to improve the patient’s use of the affected joint, stop further damage to the bone, and ensure bone and joint survival. If osteonecrosis is diagnosed early enough, collapse and joint replacement can be prevented. To reach these goals, the doctor may use one or more of the following treatments.

Non-operative Treatment

There is no known pharmaceutical cure for osteonecrosis. Several non-operative treatments have been studied including hyperbaric oxygen therapy, shock wave therapy, electrical stimulation, pharmaceuticals (anticoagulants, bisphosphonates, vasodilators, lipid lowering agents), physiotherapy and muscle strengthening exercises, and combinations thereof. There are conflicting results for some of these treatments, therefore, rigorous, randomized controlled trials with large numbers of patients are still needed to determine the effectiveness of these treatments. Non-operative treatment may be part of a wait-and-see approach based on the size of the area of dead bone. Non-operative treatments cannot be labeled as conservative, since many of them do not slow the progression of the disease or lead to avoidance of a total hip arthroplasty. Most are simply pain-relieving at best.

Reduced weight bearing does not alter the course of the disease and is not a treatment. It may be used to simply permit the patient to better cope with pain until appropriate treatment is instituted. 

Surgical Treatment

Core decompression – This surgical procedure removes or drills a tunnel into the area of the affected bone, which reduces pressure within the bone. Core decompression works best in people who are in the earliest stages of osteonecrosis, before the collapse of the dead bone. This procedure sometimes can reduce pain and slow the progression of bone and joint destruction in these patients.

Osteotomy – This surgical procedure reshapes the bone to reduce stress on the affected area. There is a lengthy recovery period, and the patient’s activities are very limited for 3 to 12 months after an osteotomy. This procedure is most effective for patients with advanced osteonecrosis and those with a small area of affected bone.

Bone graft – Bone grafts can be used as part of the surgical treatment for osteonecrosis. Bone grafts can use bone from the same patient or donor bone. Bone graft or synthetic bone graft can be inserted into the hole created by the core decompression procedure. A specialized procedure, called vascularized bone grafting, involves moving a piece of bone from another site (often the fibula, one of the bones of the calf, or the iliac crest, a portion of the pelvic bone) with a vascular attachment. This allows for support of the diseased area as well as a new source of blood supply. This is a complex procedure and is performed by surgeons that are specially trained. Another type of bone grafting, involves scraping out all of the dead bone and replacing it with healthier bone graft, often from other portions of the patient’s skeleton. 

A unique type of bone graft involves the use of a patient’s own cells that are capable of making new bone. Often these cells are a type of stem cell from the bone marrow or other bodily tissues. There has been increasing interest in the potential of stem cell therapy. This is also being studied for the treatment of osteonecrosis. Mesenchymal stem cells, which are a type of ‘adult’ stem cell, can grow and develop into many different cell types in the body. Physicians take the patient’s own mesenchymal stem cells (autologous transplant) and place them into the affected bone to stimulate bone repair and regeneration.

Arthroplasty/total joint replacement – Total joint replacement is the treatment of choice in late-stage osteonecrosis when the joint is destroyed. In this surgery, the diseased joint is replaced with artificial parts. It may be recommended for people who are not good candidates for other treatments, such as patients who do not do well with repeated attempts to preserve the joint. Various types of replacements are available, and people should discuss specific needs with their doctor.

For most people with osteonecrosis, treatment is an ongoing process. Doctors may first recommend the least complex and invasive procedure, such as protecting the joint by limiting high impact activities, and watch the effect on the patient’s condition.

Other treatments then may be used to prevent further bone destruction and reduce pain such as core decompression with bone graft/stem cell therapy,Prp injections, A2m injection. But some of these new treatments may not be covered by your insurance.

Eventually patients may need joint replacement if the disease has progressed to collapse of the bone. It is important that patients carefully follow instructions about activity limitations and work closely with their doctor to ensure that appropriate treatments are used.

Investigational Therapies

Scientists, researchers, and physicians continue to pursue a better understanding of how this disease occurs as well as compare the effectiveness of current and newly developed therapies. Often, this requires a clinical trial to answer questions and gain additional knowledge.

Information on current clinical trials is posted on the Internet at www.clinicaltrials.gov. All studies receiving U.S. government funding, and some supported by private industry, are posted on this government web site.

Information

Stem Cell

Alcohol and Osteonecrosis

Osteonecrosis Knee

Various Links Osteonecrosis

Material Used In Hip Replacements

The Many Different Materials Used in Hip Replacement Devices.

If you need a hip replacement it’s best to educate yourself .

Hip replacement devices break into a few big categories:

Metal on Metal (MOM) – These are what they sound like. Both the socket and the ball are made of stainless steel, titanium, chromium, cobalt or some combination of these. One sub-type of a MOM hip is a minimally invasive model which usually is smaller in size, so it can be installed with a smaller incision.

Polyethylene and Metal on Polyethylene (MOP) – Polyethylene is basically plastic, so these hips usually have metal structural pieces and a plastic liner where the ball and socket meet. They can also have a metal ball meeting a plastic socket liner. A sub-type of a polyethylene hip is made with a newer plastic called cross linked polyethylene, which is more durable.

Ceramic on Metal (COM), Ceramic on Ceramic (COC), Ceramic on Polyethylene (COP) – Ceramic hips are made of specialized and more durable versions of the same type of material that plates and bowls are made from. There are ceramic on metal, ceramic on ceramic, and ceramic on polyethylene versions. While these are durable, they can be vulnerable to fracture and breaking under big stresses.

Wear Particles

If for some reason I would need a hip replacement, my single biggest concern would be wear particles. This phenomenon first came to light about 5 – 7 years ago when surgeons began to replace the first worn out or failed metal on metal (MOM) hips. What they found in some patients was scary. Basically, the entire area directly around the hip replacement device had turned into a mass of black goo.

Then studies were published showing that those microscopic metal shavings were leaching into the blood stream and causing elevated metal ion levels. Additional studies began to point out that some people’s tissue was so sensitive to this junk that they formed pseudotumors, which are basically big solid masses of irritated tissues, some of which could press on important nerves. Finally, genetic studies showed that not only was this tissue visibly unhappy, the cells were getting damaged at a genetic level from the wear particles.

When all of this first came to light, it looked like only MOM hips were involved. However, as the research below shows, the issue of wear particles extends to every type of hip made.

ARMD – Adverse Reactions to Metal Debris

Before we begin, it’s worth noting that there is now a name for pissed off tissue caused by wear particles. In a 90s movie, a nuclear war head falls into the wrong hands and the main character is informed that this is called a “Broken Arrow”. He responds to the effect of, “I’m not sure what’s more disturbing, the fact that we just lost a nuclear warhead or that you actually have a name for this”. I feel the same about the fact that the orthopedic joint replacement community now has a name for wear particles that cause problems in patients.

In addition to highlighting research on wear particles, I’ll also look at the durability of each type. So let’s take a look at how to navigate this minefield.

The Research on the Various Types of Hip Replacement Materials – Focused on Wear Particles and Device Failure

MOM or “Metal on Metal”

The “bad boy” of hip replacement types is clearly MOM hips. The funniest thing is that despite all of the absolutely horrific things published about these devices, you can still find Internet ads for many surgeons who will be happy to implant them. They do this by claiming that these are “minimally invasive” hips. While there’s a tiny kernel of truth in that hogwash (the incisions needed to implant them are smaller), there is nothing minimally invasive about amputating a joint and inserting a prosthesis, no matter how you skin that cat. In addition, the smaller the device, the bigger the wear particle issue.

MOM hips produce metal wear particles locally that are then taken up in the bloodstream. In general, smaller MOM hip devices (usually those used for small framed women) have a higher likelihood of producing metal wear particles. This study showed more metal ions in the blood with MOM devices compared to conventional hip replacement prostheses. This randomized trial again demonstrated more metal ions in the blood of women with MOM hips when compared to conventional hip replacement, but also noted that pseudotumors occurred both around these MOM devices and the more conventional MOP devices as well. This recent study showed that metal debris was present in both large and small MOM hip replacement devices.

Photo from Breaking Muscle It’s all in the hips

The latest 2015 consensus guidelines are now not to perform a MOM hip replacement in small women or anybody with a known metal allergy. The latest study on MOM hips and pseudotumors concludes, “Adverse reactions to metal debris in MOM hips may not be as benign as previous reports have suggested.” Not good.

Polyethylene and Metal on Polyethylene (MOP)

When I initially began this literature search, I thought that MOP hips may be better in the wear particle department. After all, you don’t have metal rubbing on metal, but usually metal on plastic. However, I was wrong.

To see how bad things can get with MOP wear particles, I didn’t have to look far. This recent study from 2014 showed an awful side effect of both polyethylene and metal wear particles, a pseudotumor that invaded a woman’s vaginal tissues. This 2015 study was very concerning in that it compared MOP hips to MOM hips with regard to metal levels and chromosome damage in cells. It couldn’t conclude that one was better than the other. Based on this 2014 study, MOP hips wear less, but their wear particles produce slightly more tissue reaction than MOM hips. This is all consistent with a recent study I blogged on, showing that conventional polyethylene wear particles reduced stem cell activity in bone marrow and muscle.

If there is one bright spot in this category, it’s likely the newer highly cross linked polyethylene (HCLP). Based on this recent study, HCLP hips produced fewer wear particles than regular polyethylene. In another study of shoulder replacement devices, the lower debris for these devices was confirmed. In addition, based on this 2014 study HCLP devices seem to withstand unexpected wear and part failure better.

Ceramic on Metal (COM), Ceramic on Ceramic (COC), Ceramic on Polyethylene (COP)

Maybe ceramic is the way to go? After all, what could go wrong with installing a hip replacement device made of the same substance as dinner plates?

This 2015 randomized trial showed that COM hips still regrettably produced metal wear particles that ended up in the blood stream. Some good news for COM hips could be found in this 2015 study. It concluded that while there was swelling around these devices, when compared to minimally invasive MOM hips, there were no pseudotumors seen in COM hips. However, based on this analysis of many studies, there doesn’t seem to be any advantage of COC compared to COP. How does COM and COC compare? Ceramic on metal doesn’t seem to have the same durability as ceramic on ceramic based on this study.

Is Your Surgeon Being Paid to Promote a Certain Type of Hip?

One of the real challenges in navigating this landscape is that regrettably, joint replacement devices have been one of the worst areas of payola in medicine. As reimbursements have declined for the surgical procedures of installing and replacing devices, many surgeons have figured out that they can keep their cash flow stable by taking money from the device manufacturers. This has been the subject of many Department of Justice lawsuits through the years.

The big issue for patients is how to know if their surgeon is recommending a hip device because they really feel that it’s the best, or because they’re getting paid by the company making the device. This Propublica web-site will allow you to research your surgeon’s payment history.

Correct Sizing is Key!

It’s very clear from reviewing the medical research on this topic that a poorly sized hip device is a huge problem for many reasons. First, it will reduce the longevity of the device. Perhaps more importantly, it virtually guarantees more harmful wear particles. And since we’re talking about replacing your hip, a good fit is common sense.

Given the modular nature of these hip devices and the wide array of options, a poor fit should never happen. However, in my experience, hardware fitting issues usually happen when the operating room and/or hospital don’t have the correct size in stock on the day of the surgery. So agree before hand on the size of the components and make sure the staff has double-checked to make sure the hospital has that size in stock.

The upshot? All hip replacement devices produce wear particles. But which is best? It’s clear that when metal on metal implants go bad, things can go very bad with a local tissue reaction that can cause pseudotumors and high metal ions levels in the blood. If I had to get my hip replaced, I would cross this type of implant off my list. Ceramics still produce wear particles and have the added problem of fracturing in an active individual. Polyethylene wear particles in a MOP hip can be just as bad as those from a MOM hip. Given that highly cross linked polythylene has the least wear particles, this is likely the winner. However, realize that not as much is known about tissue reaction to cross linked polyethylene, so that recommendation may change with time. In addition, there are newer types of ceramics that once mated with HCLP could produce less debris.

More information Hip Replacement Material- Regenexx

Hip Replacement

FDA on Hip Replacement Parts

Kummel Disease

Avascular necrosis (AVN) develops when a bone loses its blood supply. AVN goes by several other names, including Kummel disease, osteonecrosis, aseptic necrosis, and ischemic bone necrosis. AVN typically affects bone in the hips, thighs, knees and shoulders—although it can develop in any bone in the body.

Kummel disease is a rarely occurring variation of avascular necrosis that can affect the spine’s vertebrae, usually the thoracic spine (mid back) region. There are many different spine-related disorders that can contribute to disrupting a vertebral body’s blood supply, such as infection, osteoporosis, radiation therapy, steroid use, and metastatic spine tumors. Like other organs in the body, bone needs a healthy blood supply to rebuild itself, stay strong and support the spinal column.

Though Kummell disease is rare, researchers believe it’s becoming more prevalent as the aging population grows. People with osteoporosis and older adults are at a greater risk for developing this disorder.

Kummel Disease: A Not-So-Rare Complication of Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures

As our population ages, the prevalence of osteoporosis, its most common fragility fracture (vertebral compression fracture), and Kummel disease will increase.

Also if younger and you are diagnosed with osteoporosis your chances are higher to possibly develop Kummel Disease.

Avascular Necrosis and Kummel Disease Share Some Similar Causes and Risk Factors

  • Injury: This is known as trauma-related avascular necrosis. A broken hip or vertebral fracture may lead to osteonecrosis.
  • Increased pressure within the bone: The pressure within the bone causes the blood vessels to narrow, making it hard for the vessels to deliver enough blood to the bone cells.
  • Certain risk factors: This is known as non-traumatic avascular necrosis. These risks include medical conditions and lifestyle choices that affect bone metabolism or bone remodeling.

AVN has several risk factors, including medical conditions and lifestyle choices that may increase your chances of developing the disorder:

  • Heavy alcohol use
  • Long-term corticosteroid use
  • Osteoporosis
  • Blood clots and arterial inflammation
  • Blood disorders (such as Sickle cell disease)
  • Radiation and chemotherapy
  • Pancreatitis
  • Gaucher disease (occurs when high amounts of fatty substances collect in the organs)
  • Decompression sickness (a condition causing gas bubbles in the blood)

How Doctors Diagnose Avascular Necrosis 

Diagnosing spinal AVN caused by trauma—also called Kummell disease—begins with a thorough review of your medical history and symptoms. This is all part of your physical exam.

After your physical exam, your doctor may order imaging scans to better see changes in your vertebrae.

Below are some of the tools your doctor may use to diagnose Kummell disease:

  • X-ray: This first-line imaging test can illuminate problems with your spinal bones. It’s not able to show early-stage bone problems, though.
  • Computed tomography (CT) scan: A CT scan provides a 3-dimensional picture of your bone. It also shows “slices” of bone, making the picture clearer than what x-rays and bone scans deliver.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): This technology can produce very detailed images of your soft tissues and bones. The test is sensitive enough to see bone problems at their earliest onset, which x-ray is unable to do.
  • Bone scan: Also known as skeletal scintigraphy, bone scans are often used in people who have normal x-rays. A radioactive dye is injected into your affected bone and a picture of your bone is taken with a special camera. The picture shows how the dye travels through your bone and where normal bone formation is occurring.
  • Biopsy: A biopsy is a surgical procedure in which tissue from your affected bone is removed and studied. Although a biopsy is a conclusive way to diagnose AVN, it is rarely used because it requires surgery.
  • Functional evaluation of bone: Tests to measure the pressure inside a bone may be used when your doctor strongly suspects that you have AVN, despite normal x-ray, bone scan, and MRI results. These tests are very sensitive at detecting increased pressure within your bone, but they require surgery.

How Is Avascular Necrosis Treated?

The goals of treatment for AVN include improving your use of the affected joint, stopping further damage to the bone, and ensuring bone and joint survival.

If you have an early-stage form of Kummell disease, your doctor may prescribe medications to manage pain and/or inflammation. Physical therapy (PT) may be included in your treatment plan. A physical therapist can teach you how to exercise safely to protect your joints and bones while building strength, flexibility and endurance.

Though non-surgical treatments may help keep pain at bay, they are generally a temporary solution for people with Kummel disease. In many cases, spine surgery is necessary to prevent the condition from progressing to a point that it harms your quality of life.

Spine surgery for Kummel disease may have several purposes, depending on your specific symptoms. As such, your surgeon may use a single surgical approach or combine techniques to give you the best possible outcome. For example:

  • If you have developed abnormal kyphosis, your doctor may recommend osteotomy (surgical removal of bone) combined with spinal instrumentation and fusion. This combination of surgical procedures can reduce the size of the kyphotic curve, realign the spine and stabilize it.
  • Some patients with Kummel disease have pain and neurological symptoms, such as numbness or weakness. If symptoms are caused by nerve compression, a spinal decompression surgery (such as a foraminotomy) may be recommended to relief pressure on pinched nerves and prevent potentially permanent nerve damage.

Another surgical option for AVN is known as core decompression. This procedure involves removing the inner layer of bone, which reduces pressure within the bone, increases blood flow to the bone, and allows more blood vessels to form.

Core decompression works best in people who are in the earliest stages of avascular necrosis, often before the collapse of a joint. This procedure may reduce pain and slow progression of bone and joint destruction.

After core decompression, your surgeon may implant bone graft to help stimulate new bone growth and healing. Bone graft transplants healthy bone from a part of the body, such as the leg, to the diseased area. Several synthetic bone grafts are also available. Depending on the location and extent of the surgery, expect a lengthy recovery period, usually from 6 to 12 months.

As with all areas of medicine, researchers are continuously exploring treatments that may help people with AVN. One area of interest is therapies that increase the growth of new bone and blood vessels. These treatments have been used experimentally alone and in combination with other treatments, such as osteotomy and core decompression.

Your doctor will work with you to develop a custom treatment plan that addresses your symptoms and medical history.

Your Outlook with Avascular Necrosis (Kummel Disease)

For most people with avascular necrosis (also known as osteonecrosis, aseptic necrosis, and ischemic bone necrosis), treatment is an ongoing process. Your doctor may first recommend the least invasive approach and observe how you respond before progressing you to more substantial AVN therapies. If your condition affects your spinal vertebrae and was caused by trauma or injury (Kummell disease), several treatments may help prevent complications like spinal fracture, kyphosis deformity, and nerve pain from disrupting your life.

Educating On Bone Marrow Edema

Good Morning Pain Warriors Around The World
It is time to educate on the various causes of
Avascular Necrosis-Osteonecrosis
So twice a week we will post some educational info on a cause with links

Today Its Bone Marrow Edema

What is Bone Marrow Edema?
Bone marrow edema is a condition when excess fluids in the bone marrow build up and cause swelling. It is often caused by a response to an injury, such as a broken bone or a bruise, or a more chronic condition such as osteoporosis. Bone marrow edema most commonly occurs in the hips, knees and ankles. In this case, bone marrow edema of the knee is a main cause of localized knee and joint pain, and is only diagnosable via a Magnetic Resonance Imagining test (MRI).
It is usually caused by the following scenarios:
• Avascular necrosis, or “bone death”. This is when a small portion of the bone dies, and can result in a painful bone marrow edema
• Any type of knee bone trauma, including broken bones and bone bruises.
• Joint disorders such as osteoarthritis or osteoporosis. In this case, the knee joint is lacking the cushion that cartilage provides, which can lead to easier fracture and wear on the bone. Subsequently, if a fracture of the bone occurs, the injured area becomes susceptible to edema..
• Knee ligament injuries.
• A condition such as synovitis (an inflammation of the lining the joints, called synovial membranes).
• In rare conditions, bone tumor.
Symptoms of Bone Marrow Edema in the Knee
Bone marrow edemas may not bother you at all, or they may be painful and inconvenient. They can feel more intense than a muscular injury (for example, a muscle bruise) at times due to the nature of the bone. A muscle is capable of swelling, which increases blood flow to heal the area. Unfortunately, bones are not capable of swelling, and thus the fluid (edema) that collects in the marrow can create intense pressure within the bone, resulting in more intense pain. In fact, in many osteoarthritic patients, it isn’t the lack of cartilage that’s causing them pain, but rather the pressure due to the edema.

Some of the most common symptoms of bone marrow endema include:
• Varying degrees of pain, from mild to moderate, depending on the severity and Trauma.
• Swelling of the knee area.
• Inability to put full pressure on the knee to walk.
• Recurrent pain and tenderness.
• Bruising.
Treatment of Bone Marrow Edema in the Knee
Thankfully, most bone marrow edemas will settle down and heal on their own after the injury has subsided. For example, in some cases of osteonecrosis the bone will regenerate itself and heal the edema but note : not all cases of osteonecrosis or spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee will have the ability to heal itself. Unfortunately, though, in the case of osteoarthritis, the edema may only get worse over time. In this circumstance, treatment options may be explored.
Traditional treatments for bone marrow edema usually involve rehabilitation through physiotherapy and rest. Ice, medications such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen, and even a crutch or a cane can help as well. There is one drug-facilitated treatment that uses a bisphosphonate and vitamin D mixture to help increase bone density. When this treatment is delivered via intravenous, it is found to be quite effective in reducing pain and increasing density. Other drugs that usually treat the vascular system have been found effective for bone marrow edema, in that they encourage blood flow and treat any vascular abnormalities that may exist in the bone and marrow.
In some more challenging cases, core decompression may be used. This is a type of surgery where a surgeon drills a hole into the affected part of the bone allowing that area of the bone to experience increased blood flow, form new blood vessels, and heal.
Another option is subchondroplasty, which can be especially effective for osteoarthritis patients. In this procedure, an x-ray determines where the edema is. The patient is then sedated, and a small needle injects a paste into the area of the edema. The paste then hardens and provides more strength and density to the bone. By improving the strength of the bone, it will enable the bone to deal with the pain of the edema and of the osteoarthritis.
http://louisvillebones.com/understanding-bone-marrow-edema/

Knee
https://www.g2orthopedics.com/bone-marrow-edema-in-the-knee/
https://www.researchgate.net/…/7224238_Bone_marrow_edema_in…
https://www.researchgate.net/…/7224238_Bone_marrow_edema_in…
https://www.hindawi.com/journals/crirh/2018/7657982/

Hip Study
https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/94/4/1068/2596208

https://www.ajronline.org/doi/10.2214/AJR.05.0086

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15049532

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4972799/

Shoulder
https://www.sciencedirect.com/…/veterinary-sc…/osteonecrosis

Ankle
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21189186
https://www.footanklesurgery-journal.com/…/S1268-7…/abstract

 

If you have #Osteonecrosis feel free to join our #group

AvascualrNecrosis/Osteonecrosis Support Int’l

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Joint Pain

 Congratulations !  If you’re like me you are one of the 30 million adults in the United States who suffer with joint pain, you know the pain often is debilitating. It can keep you from staying active and limits your mobility and it even makes daily chores seem impossible. What you might not know is that many doctors can treat joint pain with more than just pills or surgery. Beware though some doctors will tell you about one procedure and then change it once they know your insurance example Medicare I felt one doctor thought less of me as a patient because I am disabled so he changed or tried to change the procedure. It pissed me off because I was all set to get the procedure we discussed and then he changed it.

Both procedures were covered under Medicare so I felt betrayed as if I wasn’t good enough for the other injection.

Newsflash …..people on Medicare pay for the insurance they have. It’s not free , hell I pay more for insurance than when I was working.

But thankfully Medicare is good coverage. Low deductible.

It’s some doctors that treat you like a second class citizen.

Make sure this doesn’t happen to you.

 

Depending on the severity of your pain, injections can be another option for easing your joint pain and help to get you moving again.

Doctors use these injections to try to reduce inflammation and pain in your joints some come with side effects and some risks.

The injections range from corticosteroids, which have been around for decades, to newer ortho-biologic injections like platelet-rich plasma (PRP) , Stem Cell and placental tissue matrix (PTM)

 

You and your physician will decide which one is best based on your individual needs. The issue is finding doctors qualified to do these.

Not every injection is right for every patient, in my case I hate steroid injections, not only did it make my pain worse it also comes with the risk of developing osteonecrosis. Something I already have. I have noticed that it seems like doctors are quick to prescribe and inject steroids. I stand my ground and refuse. But that’s me.

 

So here are some facts to help you know more about the options.

Corticosteroid injections

 

Use: This injection is the first line of defense against osteoarthritis symptoms and other joint pain in shoulders, knees and hips. Corticosteroids can offer relief for two to three months, and reduce inflammatory cell activity in the joint. In some people.

Side effects and Risks : As with all injections, there’s a small chance of infection about one in 1,000 as well as Joint infection.

Nerve damage.

Thinning of skin and soft tissue around the injection site.

Temporary flare of pain and inflammation in the joint.

Tendon weakening or rupture.

Thinning of nearby bone (osteoporosis)

Osteonecrosis lack of blood supply to the bone

Raised blood sugar level

Whitening or lightening of the skin around the injection site

Cost: Most insurance covers the $100 -$200 usd cost of these injections. Your insurance provider may require that you try at least one corticosteroid injection first to see whether it works. If not, you may move on to a different therapy.

 

Hyaluronic acid injections

Use: Hyaluronic acid (HA) injections often are used when corticosteroid injections don’t work. But they usually are approved only for use in the knee.

In some instances, doctors consider an HA injection first if you don’t have obvious signs of inflammation. HA also is a better option if you have diabetes, as corticosteroids can raise blood sugar levels.

Also known as gel injections, HA injections are chemically similar to your natural joint fluid.

When you have osteoarthritis which is different than osteonecrosis lucky me I have both, the joint fluid becomes watery.

So, this injection helps to restore the fluid’s natural properties and works as a lubricant and a shock absorber.

HA is a cushion or a buffer against inflammatory cells in the joint.  In some cases, it can stimulate the knee to start producing more natural HA.” Some physicians also believe that HA helps reduce pain by coating nerve endings within the joint.

One treatment, which may consist of between one and three injections, usually offers symptom relief for four to five months, but sometimes up to one years. However, pain and stiffness will return. Most insurance companies only approve one HA injection every six months.

In knees with osteoarthritis, the joint fluid (called synovial fluid) can break down and not provide the cushioning your knee needs

Durolane

Euflexxa

Hyalgan

Orthovisc

Monovisc

Supartz

Synvisc, Synvisc-One

Depending on which type your doctor uses, you may get a single shot. Or you’ll get three to five injections spaced a week apart.

 

Side effects: There’s a 1-in-100 chance of an inflammatory reaction, The most common short-term side effects are minor pain at the injection site and minor buildup of joint fluid. These get better within a few days.

 

Cost: HA injections cost more — about $300 to $850 per injection, but most insurance companies cover the cost for knee injections.

 

 

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections

Use: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections can treat osteoarthritis joint pain, and are being thoroughly researched to understand their effects.

These injections use your own blood and platelets to promote healing. Platelets contain growth factors and proteins that aid healing in soft tissues. Research shows PRP injections can alter the immune response to help reduce inflammation,

Side effects: Side effects include a very low risk of infection and pain at the injection site. You must stop oral anti-inflammatory medications for a short amount of time if you get a PRP injection.

Cost: Insurance companies don’t generally cover PRP injections and you will pay between $400 and $1,300 per injection out-of-pocket.

 

Stem Cell Injections

The world’s most advanced regenerative injection treatments for treating knee pain due to arthritis, meniscus tears, traumatic ligament injuries, overuse conditions and other degenerative conditions.

 

Side effects : mild discomfort associated with the procedure. There is a very small risk of infection whenever aspirations and injections are performed. Nerve damage, vessel damage, and injury to other important structures are exceedingly rare

 

Placental tissue matrix (PTM) injections

 

Use: Placental Tissue Matrix (PTM) injections can very profoundly decrease the pain related to osteoarthritis.

 

These are injections of placental tissue, which is obtained after a healthy baby is delivered from a healthy mother. Research has discovered that there is a large number of growth factors in placental tissue that promote healing, Dr. Genin says.

Side effects: Side effects include a  low risk of infection and pain at the injection site. The placental tissue is “immune privileged,” which means the body would not have an adverse reaction to it.

Cost: Insurance companies don’t generally cover PTM injections; you will pay around $1,800 -$2500 per injection out-of-pocket.

 

Many of these injections often are effective in reducing or stopping your joint pain, but it’s important to remember that they may not keep the pain from returning, Dr. Schaefer says. In fact, they’re most effective when used with other therapies.

 

As a patient who has Osteonecrosis, Osteoarthritis, and other stuff I consider surgical options as a last resort only if other treatment options have failed. Unfortunately some treatments I cannot even afford to try. I wish the FDA would get a move on and approve some things so insurance companies can have this as a form of treatment.

 

 

 

 

Stem Cells

 

BONE MARROW AND FAT CELLS

The stem cells used in this point of care clinic are Autologous Cells that we take from your own body.  These cells are taken from your own Bone Marrow or Fat Cells.  The cells are your own Stem Cells and will not be rejected by your body.

Taking the Bone Marrow or Fat Cells from your body is relatively painless as a mild local anesthetic is used prior to harvesting.  These cells are processed to receive the most stem cell gain and then injected into the area of your body where you need the growth factors to go to work the quickest.  Your blood is also drawn and your platelet rich plasma is added to the Stem Cells taken from your Bone Marrow or Fat Cells to increase the activity of the growth factors.

It is important that these cells are used the day they are extracted from your body in order to insure they remain alive and active.  Our clinic does not grow extra stem cells from your Bone Marrow or Fat Cells to ensure that they are alive and active.  It is an FDA requirement that you receive your cells the same day they are harvested.

You get only the stem cells we extract from your body and there is no other manipulation used except extraction and preparation of the samples taken from your own body.  The cells are taken in a procedure that creates only mild discomfort or none at all.  Ninety nine percent of our patients experience no pain obtaining bone marrow or fat cells.

CORD STEM CELLS:

Embryo and Placenta stem cells can create certain types of cancers.  The cord blood Stem Cells should only be used if they are obtained from a healthy relative and you are a good match.  Cord Stem Cells that are used outside of the country or shipped to this country are illegal.  The FDA has found diseases in these grown cells and states that most of them are dead.  Even though the physicians supplying these Cord Cells claim they are safe to use, you should use extreme caution before considering these procedures.

ARE YOU A CANDIDATE FOR THESE STEM CELL PROCEDURES

REBUILDING JOINTS & SPINE: The Stem Cells that are obtained from your body are placed into all joints and spine to rebuild and regenerate new tissue growth as determined by the clinic physician.   There has been clinical evidence that new cartilage can be grown within your joint provided you are determined a candidate by the clinical physician.  Not all patients will be a candidate and may require joint replacement.

TORN TENDONS:  If the patients tendons are not completely torn this procedure will produce new tissue growth to regenerate torn tendons. Our clinic physician can only determine this with an initial visit and evaluation.

How Does PRP Therapy Work?

To prepare PRP, a small amount of blood is taken from the patient. The blood is then placed in a centrifuge. The centrifuge spins and through a multi-functional process separates the plasma from the blood producing the PRP. This increases the concentration of platelets and growth factors up to 500% also increasing hMSC (human stem cells) proliferation as a function of 8-day exposure to platelet released concentrations 10x. (x= increase above native levels)

When PRP is injected into the damaged area it stimulates the tendon or ligament causing mild inflammation that triggers the healing cascade. As a result new collagen begins to develop. As this collagen matures it begins to shrink causing the tightening and strengthening of the tendons and ligaments of the damaged area.

What is Platelet Rich Plasma?

Platelet Rich Plasma or PRP is blood plasma with concentrated platelets. The concentrated platelets found in PRP include growth factors among the huge reservoirs of bioactive proteins that are vital to initiate and accelerate tissue repair and regeneration. These bioactive proteins increase stem cell production to initiate connective tissue healing, bone regeneration and repair, promote development of new blood vessels and stimulate the wound healing process.

PRP Regenerates Tendons & Ligaments

Tendons connect the muscle to the bone making it possible for you to do many everyday physical activities. Overuse or damage to the tendon over a long period of time causes the collagen fibers in the tendons to form small tears, a condition called tendonitis. Damage to tendons most often occurs in the knees, ankles, hips, spine, elbows, shoulders, and wrists.

Ligaments are composed of collagen fibers that hold one bone to another, stabilizing the joint and controlling the range of motion. When a ligament is damaged, it is no longer able to support the bones in the joint, which often leads to pain symptoms. The instability causing the pain in your joints does not always show up on high tech imaging equipment. Through a thorough neurological and orthopedic evaluation Dr. Baum can determine which ligaments and tendons are unstable due to injury, wear or tear.

Tendons and ligaments have a poor blood supply and they do not usually heal from damage. Combined with the stress of day-to-day activities tendons and ligaments become inefficient causing degeneration of the joint which leads to chronic pain and weakness. Patients who experience chronic pain may not even remember when the injury occurred.

How Does PRP Compare With Cortisone Shots?

Studies have shown that cortisone injections may actually weaken tissue. Cortisone shots may provide temporary relief and stop inflammation, but may not provide long term healing. PRP therapy is healing and strengthening these tendons and ligaments and in some cases thickening the tissue up to 40%.

Treatment Plan

PRP injections with guided ultrasound can be performed on tendons and ligaments all over the body. Cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine, degenerative disc disease, arthritic joints shoulder pain, hip pain, and knee pain, even the smaller joints of the body can all be treated effectively with PRP. Dr. Baum will determine whether prolo solution, Platelet Rich Plasma or a combination of both will be the most effective form of treatment for you during his initial consult and evaluation.

Frequency Of Treatments

While responses to treatment vary, most people will require 3 to 6 sets of injections of PRP. Each set of treatments is spaced 4 to 6 weeks apart.

Is PRP Right For Me?

If you have degenerative spine or joint disease, a tendon or ligament injury, laxity or tear and traditional methods have not provided relief then PRP therapy may be the solution. It will heal tissue with minimal or no scarring and alleviates further degeneration and builds new tissues. There will be an initial evaluation with Dr. Baum to see if PRP therapy is right for you.

What Can Be Treated?

Platelet Rich Plasma injections helps regenerate all areas of the body including the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine, wrists, elbows, shoulders, hips, knees and ankles as well as tendons and ligaments all over the body.  Dr. Baum is one of the few physicians performing PRP procedures to all areas of the spine.  Our clinic treats patients with sports injuries, arthritic and degenerative joints and degenerative disc disease. More specific injuries including tennis elbow, carpal tunnel syndrome, scoliosis, ACL tears, shin splints, rotator cuff tears, plantar faciitis and iliotibial band syndrome may all be effectively treated with PRP.

What Are The Potential Benefits?

Patients can see a significant improvement in symptoms as well as a remarkable return of function. This may eliminate the need for more aggressive treatments such as long-term medication or surgery.

Special Instructions

You are restricted from the use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) one week prior to the procedure and throughout the course of treatments.

Initially the procedure may cause some localized soreness and discomfort. Most patients only require some extra-strength Tylenol to help with the pain. Ice and heat may be applied to the area as needed.

How Soon Can I Go Back Regular Activities?

PRP therapy helps regenerate tendons and ligaments but it is not a quick fix. This therapy is stimulating the growth of new tissue requiring time and rehabilitation. Under Dr. Baum’s supervision patients will begin an exercise program immediately following the first procedure. During the treatment program most people are able to resume normal activities and exercise.

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) Matrix Graft by David Crane, MD and Peter A.M. Everts PhD

PRP application techniques in musculoskeletal medicine utilize the concentrated healing components of a patient’s own blood—reintroduced into a specific site—to regenerate tissue and speed the healing process

PRP INJECTION APPLICATION SITES

Spine

Cervical/Thoracic/Lumbar/Sacral

Shoulders & Elbows

Wrist & Hand

Hip/Pelvis

Knee & Lower Leg

Ankle & Foot

Fingers & Toes

Arthritic Joints

Osteoarthritis

Some Osteonecrosis

 

Information

http://www.prolotherapy.com/PPM_JanFeb2008_Crane_PRP.pdf

https://drjamesbaum.com/wp-content/uploads/stemcells2002-0109.pdf

 

Important Videos Everyone Should watch on Biologics

https://drjamesbaum.com/2013/07/the-science-of-mesenchymal-stem-cells-and-regenerative-medicine/

 

Scientific Papers on Research of Stem Cells

https://drjamesbaum.com/stem-cells/scientific-papers/

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I will be posting this in my other blog section also