Blog Posts and Ebooklet

New App for Smartphones called VIM Pain Mgmt

This is a really good app, it’s new released by the arthritis foundation just a couple weeks ago.

It’s a great way to connect with others that understand what it’s like to live with pain.

It provides tips to help ease the stress and anxiety that come with chronic pain.

Discusses various treatments from diet to meditation, to acupuncture to prp and stem cell injections to joint replacement .

The app tries to help those living in pain have options to have a better quality of life. It helps track your pain so you can discuss this with your doctor or surgeon.

It also gives you ways to register to get connected with National and at Some point Local connect groups in your area . All this is free. Ypu can even link to the podcast.

I am the Facilitator for the Boardman Ohio LIVE Yes Connect. I try to provide support, and patient education via information as well as guest speakers as well as group interaction.

Right now we are on zoom, but will be at some point back face to face as well as remain on zoom also. I think zoom is good because you can attend right from your hone or work or pulled over in your can.

That’s why I volunteer for the Arthritis Foundation, they provide so much to so many.

Give it a try…. one of the best apps I have.

If you use it. Use the same email as your arthritis.org email for Live Yes Connect. That way you can be up to date and linked to all great things the AF has to offer in one easy app.

Wishing you all a pain free day

Deb

Osteonecrosis and Organ transplant

Osteonecrosis is a well-recognized complication associated with organ transplantation.

It is a pathological condition characterized by the death of the cellular constituents of bone and marrow. The process of aseptic bone necrosis is associated with glucocorticoid use, and the mechanism by which glucocorticoids initiate the pathologic process has recently been elucidated.

Rates are particularly high in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The incidence of osteonecrosis also increases in patients on dialysis.

The exact prevalence of osteonecrosis after organ transplantation is, however, difficult to assess as many cases are clinically silent.

The most common symptom of osteonecrosis is hip pain that is usually deep in nature, localized to the groin with occasional radiation down the thigh to the knee.

Symptoms are usually exacerbated by physical activity and weight bearing and relieved by rest. In the late stages of osteonecrosis, pain is often present at rest, and patients may develop a limp, as they are no longer able to bear weight on the affected joint.

Osteonecrosis affecting the bone beneath a weight-bearing joint surface is associated with a significant risk of developing a subarticular fracture, which appears to initiate the symptoms.

Optimizing the dose of glucocorticoids has led to a significant reduction in the incidence of osteonecrosis post-transplantation. Substituting these agents entirely with calcineurin inhibitors may decrease this complication of the transplantation process even further. Early diagnosis using magnetic resonance imaging is essential for the success of available surgical interventions

Reference: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780121835026500213

https://online.boneandjoint.org.uk/doi/full/10.1302/0301-620x.89b12.19400?journalCode=bjj&

http://www0.sun.ac.za/aotc/general/renal/renal.php

Out with the old and in with the new

Being an advocate for bone and joint pain and personally living with osteoarthritis osteonecrosis and spondylolisthesis pain .

I saw our community struggle in new and ways besides living and dealing with daily pain.

People suddenly couldn’t access routine care because of lockdowns, fear and added anxiety.

They became more isolated than ever before. They and their family members faced job losses and financial hardship.

As an advocate for arthritis and a facilitator for my local LIVE YES Connect Group, I had to cancel or postpone in-person programs and events.

But on the plus side we went virtual on Zoom

Some members and their families faced added strain, whether dealing with virtual school or safety concerns for loved ones in nursing homes.

It’s a year most are happy to see come to an end.

But as a person with pain, I am always compelled to find silver linings. Even in the mist of challenging of times.

In 2020, I got to travel to Washington D.C participate in a focus group and then speak on Capital Hill.

I met some fantastic people from our state representatives to other leaders and advocates who work so hard to create a strong support system for so many causes and conditions.

I got to stay in a great city and tour the beautiful historical city of Washington D.C

We made great strides in accessibility, as health care system finally embraced telehealth and more companies allowed remote work.

Many disabled now gave hope to possibly getting a part time job working from home now because we see it is doable.

We seen a President work tirelessly to get pharmaceutical companies to create a vaccine quickly that will be safe for the USA and world.

We gave witnessed the power of science and innovation with the development of promising treatments and vaccines.

We saw our neighbors and communities come together to support one another in their time of need.

Despite the news only showing negativity there was a lot of positive happening.

2020 shown how resilient we are. And to never lose faith. Be grateful for everyday.

I don’t know what 2021 will bring;

I’m hoping it will be a fantastic year.

I just want to Thank you for your support, and following me on IG, Blog, and all social media platforms I promise to bring you current and uplifting information in 2021 and I wish you all a safe, healthy, prosperous and happy new year

Awareness Day For Avascular Necrosis- Osteonecrosis

Several states have officially proclaimed today as Osteonecrosis awareness day this past year a few more states came on the awareness train. And by next year God willing all 50 state’s as well as the US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico will as well.

I will post the entire list later

But for now – Below are some posts and info

https://avascularnecrosiseducation.com/2020/05/24/avascular-necrosis-mask/amp/

Today is Avascular Necrosis Osteonecrosis Awareness Day

https://avascularnecrosiseducation.com/tag/educate/

https://avascularnecrosiseducation.com/2019/11/18/official-proclamation-avascular-necrosis-osteonecrosis-awareness-dsy-november-29/

Osteoarthritis vs Osteonecrosis

Question

Could you elaborate on how osteoarthritis can be a secondary condition to avascular necrosis? And how can avascular necrosis adversely affect a confirmed primary diagnosis of osteoarthriris?

That a great question and I will explain both with diagrams

Answer

Osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis (avascular necrosis) are two diferent problems. Osteoarthritis occurs with when the cartilage wears thin and degrades. It is thought to primarily a cartilage problem although recently some investigators have raised the theory that collapse of bone at the cartilage interface may also contribute.

Osteonecrosis occurs when the bone does not get enough blood supply and dies. This occurs most commonly after trauma to the joint injury, to say meniscus or a diver gets the bends . Patients with certain blood disorders, patients with lupus or those who are taking high doses of prednisone are also at risk for osteonecrosis.

The confusion comes when a joint is so badly degenerated or “at its endstage”.

So at that point it is often impossible to distinguish between the two problems.

There are many causes for developing Osteonecrosis aka Avascular Necrosis.

Points To Remember About Osteonecrosis

  • Osteonecrosis is a bone disease that may cause pain or limit physical activity.
  • Anyone can get osteonecrosis, but it is most common in people in their 30s, 40s, and 50s.
  • Osteonecrosis results from the loss of blood supply to the bone. Without blood, the bone tissue dies and the bone collapses.
  • Loss of blood supply to the bone can be caused by medicines or medical procedures, medical conditions, alcohol use, injury, or increased bone pressure. It is not always known what causes the loss of blood supply to the bone.
  • Most people with osteonecrosis need treatment. Your treatment options may be nonsurgical, surgical, or both.

What is osteonecrosis?

Osteonecrosis is a bone disease. It results from the loss of blood supply to the bone. Without blood, the bone tissue dies. This causes the bone to collapse. It may also cause the joints that surround the bone to collapse. If you have osteonecrosis, you may have pain or be limited in your physical activity.

Osteonecrosis can develop in any bone, most often in the:

  • Thigh bone (femur).
  • Upper arm bone (humerus).
  • Knees.
  • Shoulders.
  • Ankles.

It is also called:

  • Avascular necrosis.
  • Aseptic necrosis.
  • Ischemic necrosis.

Points To Remember About Osteoarthritis

  • Osteoarthritis is a joint disease in which the tissues in the joint break down over time. It is the most common type of arthritis and is more common in older people.
  • Common symptoms of osteoarthritis include joint pain, stiffness, and swelling, as well as changes in how the joint moves and feeling like the joint is loose or unstable.
  • Treatment of osteoarthritis usually includes exercising, maintaining a healthy weight, wearing braces to help with stability, and taking medications, if prescribed.
  • You can do many things to help you live with osteoarthritis, including using hot and cold therapies, avoiding repeated movements, and taking a class to help you learn about the condition.

What is osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis is a joint disease that happens when the tissues in the joint break down over time. It is the most common type of arthritis and is more common in older people.

People with osteoarthritis usually have joint pain and, after rest, stiffness (inability to move easily) for a short period of time. The most commonly affected joints include the:

  • Hands (ends of the fingers and at the base and ends of the thumbs).
  • Knees.
  • Hips.
  • Neck.
  • Shoulder
  • Lower back.

Osteoarthritis affects each person differently. For some people, osteoarthritis does not affect day-to-day activities. For others, it causes significant pain and disability.

Honored to be A Nominee WEGOHealth Awards 2020

I am so honored to share that I am a nominee in the WEGOHealth Awards for Best In Show Community and Patient Leader Hero

#WEGOHealthChat #WEGOHealthAwards #PatientLeader #Osteoarthritis #Osteonecrosis #Grateful

My WEGOHealth Profile Link

ChronicallyGratefulDebla   and  https://avascularnecrosiseducation.com

Voting will begin in July and link will be posted then to vote.

Until then if you wish to nominate me or read about WEGOHealth please go to

WEGOHealthAwards Vote – Review Nominees – How It Works -The Judges

 

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Avascular Necrosis Mask

Many requested masks as so many cannot find them , so I contacted a local shop in my area and we made these two designs. The mask are washable

I don’t get paid anything for or a portion of the masks just doing this as a way to help those wearing a mask support the cause of Osteonecrosis aka Avascular Necrosis.

If you wish to purchase here is info. And they ship worldwide

They are closed on Sundays and Holidays

Afterburner FX

3600 Schotten Road

Hubbard Ohio 44425

3305347653 phone

Afterburner FX

Mask design

@Debla2020

Cat’s Claw

The site is for entertainment and informational purposes only and does not provide medical advice or treatment.

Consult your physician before adding or omitting anything to your daily regimen.

1. What is Cat’s Claw?

Cat’s claw is a medicinal herb made from the vine, roots, and bark of the cat’s claw plant. Found in South America, the plant’s popular name comes from its claw-shaped thorns. Research points to many immune system-boosting compounds that promote the relief of many types of ailments.

Native to the Amazon rainforest, and can be traced back to Inca civilization Cat’s Claw (Uncaria tomentosa) has been used for centuries by indigenous people and herbalists for medicinal preparations to address health concerns such as asthmas, arthritis, rheumatism, urinary and kidney problems, and inflammation. In modern herbal medicine, Cat’s Claw is often recommended for chronic illnesses such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, mononucleosis, as well as arthritis.

A potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory botanical, Cat’s Claw is used to treat joint problems that occur with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

In a small clinical trial, Cat’s Claw was shown to decrease pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as osteoarthritis of the knee. The medicinal benefits of Cat’s Claw come from chemicals called pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids, which boost the immune system and help temper inflammation.  

The concentration of medicinally active chemicals in Cat’s Claw vary based on when and how the plant is harvested.

A holistic health physician will be knowledgeable about a product’s purity and potency, as well as which form of Cat’s Claw supplement is best for you. For example, your physician may suggest tea, tincture, extract or capsule depending upon your health concerns.

Some people experience upset stomach, headache or dizziness when using Cat’s Claw.

Also, it is not recommended for women who are pregnant or nursing, or for children under age three.

Unlike some natural medicines, the reputation of cat’s claw as a wide-ranging remedy is now wholly validated by science. Though not usually recommended in combination with other medicines, the health benefits of cat’s claw are vast.

Resources

Johnson, R.L., S. Foster, Low Dog, T. and Kiefer, D. National Geographic Guide to Medicinal Herbs: The World’s Most Effective Healing Plants. (2012) pp. 204-207. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic.

Yasuda, G., et al., “Rheumatoid Arthritis” in Textbook of Natural Medicine by Pizzorno, Joseph E. & Michael T. Murray. (Chapter 205, p 1769). (2013) St. Louis, MO Elsevier.

Mur E, Hartig F, Eibl G, Schirmer M. “Randomized double blind trial of an extract from the pentacyclic alkaloid-chemotype of uncaria tomentosa for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.” J Rheumatol. (2002 Apr) 29(4):678-81. Accessed 22 Apr 2018.

Arthritis Research Center-UK. “Cat’s Claw.” Accessed 22 Apr 18