Osteonecrosis and Organ transplant

Osteonecrosis is a well-recognized complication associated with organ transplantation.

It is a pathological condition characterized by the death of the cellular constituents of bone and marrow. The process of aseptic bone necrosis is associated with glucocorticoid use, and the mechanism by which glucocorticoids initiate the pathologic process has recently been elucidated.

Rates are particularly high in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The incidence of osteonecrosis also increases in patients on dialysis.

The exact prevalence of osteonecrosis after organ transplantation is, however, difficult to assess as many cases are clinically silent.

The most common symptom of osteonecrosis is hip pain that is usually deep in nature, localized to the groin with occasional radiation down the thigh to the knee.

Symptoms are usually exacerbated by physical activity and weight bearing and relieved by rest. In the late stages of osteonecrosis, pain is often present at rest, and patients may develop a limp, as they are no longer able to bear weight on the affected joint.

Osteonecrosis affecting the bone beneath a weight-bearing joint surface is associated with a significant risk of developing a subarticular fracture, which appears to initiate the symptoms.

Optimizing the dose of glucocorticoids has led to a significant reduction in the incidence of osteonecrosis post-transplantation. Substituting these agents entirely with calcineurin inhibitors may decrease this complication of the transplantation process even further. Early diagnosis using magnetic resonance imaging is essential for the success of available surgical interventions

Reference: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780121835026500213

https://online.boneandjoint.org.uk/doi/full/10.1302/0301-620x.89b12.19400?journalCode=bjj&

http://www0.sun.ac.za/aotc/general/renal/renal.php

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ChronicallyGratefulDebla

The body always knows what to do to heal itself. The challenge is listening and doing what your body needs. I was diagnosed with Osteoarthritis in 2012, Avascular Necrosis aka Osteonecrosis in my knee in 2014 and Factor V Leiden hetero, and Spondylolisthesis 2016 Health Advocate-Health Activist-World Changer Love photography, cooking, hiking, walking ,traveling and learning to live a new normal since my diagnosis. My Links Facebook Main Profile https://www.facebook.com/debbie.briglovichandio Main Blog www.ChronicallyGratefulDebla.com Twitter - https://twitter.com/debbiea001 Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/debbiea_1962 and https://www.instagram.com/chronicallygratefulme Support Group Avascular Necrosis/Osteonecrosis Support Int’l https://m.facebook.com/groups/DeadBoneDiseaseAvn Awareness for Avascular Necrosis & Other Conditions of The Bone and Joints https://www.facebook.com/AvascularNecrosisAndBoneDiseaseAwareness/ Avascular Necrosis Awareness Day November 29 – working with elected officials to get this recognized in all states https://www.facebook.com/AwarenessByDebla/ Avascular Necrosis-Osteonecrosis Knowledge and Education https://www.facebook.com/AvascularNecrosisEducation/ Facebook Link https://m.facebook.com/ChronicallyGrateful.Me/

3 thoughts on “Osteonecrosis and Organ transplant”

  1. Hello! I am glad I found your website! I was diagnosed in 2019 and have been spending too much time reading on AVN. I made a small AVN web forum not too long ago, but I still have a lot of work to do. tribeavn.com (I hope you don’t mind the plug).

    While it is probably too late for me. I still like to read about the ongoing research and potential future of treatment. Two big companies that really got my attention:

    1. Epibone.
    2. Bonus Biogroup

    They both do somewhat of the same thing, but Epibone is US based and Biogroup is in Israel. They both work on using your own cells to grow a bone and possibly use that for graft or replacement or any other myriad of treatments.
    Here is a video of Epibone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yJoQj5-TIvE

    There’s also a breakthrough treatment for early stage AVN by Dr. SAAD in New Jersey. He basically uses microsurgery to reattach blood vessels.

    I am bookmarking your website. It is great!

    Liked by 1 person

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