Poor Diet and Being Overweight doesn’t help Osteonecrosis

I lived for 20 years with osteoarthritis but nothing was as scary and painful as my Osteonecrosis diagnosis. I gained a lot of weight because I. Oils no longer work and I won’t lie I stuffed myself with food to comfort myself. I went up to 293 lbs. I can’t believe I let myself get that big. Something had to change because I was too fat for a joint replacement and honestly I didn’t want one. So I had to do something, so I changed the way I ate I noticed a great improvement. People thought I was crazy but I had less pain.

I didn’t quit everything cold Turkey. I did stop smoking cold Turkey best decision I ever made.

I added more plants raw and cooked and lessened the meat intake. I started out having meatless Monday Wednesday and Friday soon it was meatless Saturday also.

I cut out 85% of all the crackers and cheese puffs all the stuff that we love but know it’s not real food. When I wanted chips I made a baked potato or a baked sweet potato. When I wanted chips and dip I made my own bean dip and hummus and dipped peppers, celery and sometimes a few crackers. I wasn’t perfect but I really began eating to live not living to eat.

My cholesterol dropped to fantastic numbers I went from total cholesterol of 210 to a total of 172 in a matter of months then down to 158. My good cholesterol went from 38 to 60. So I was on the right path. It wasn’t easy, it still isn’t easy because let’s face it junk food is every place. My next post I will post about how to eat healthy at fast food restaurants and yummy food fast that’s healthy!!

I became a flexitarian meaning I ate mostly plant based and once a week ate chicken and fish. Backed or grilled .

Good bye to greasy fried food, I also cut out 80 percent of processed junk .

Stopped all cola and sugary drinks I never was much of a pop drinker.

Many thought this was crazy and would not do much. But it did.

Then in 2019 there was a study that also confirmed similar findings .

I got off blood pressure medication and my bones didn’t feel like a tourniquet around them.

I also with the ok if my Ortho started taking Cureamed curcumin 375 1-2 times a day for 2 weeks then just once a day. It seemed to help my pain and thinned my blood some. So if you take blood thinners don’t just try this.

Always talk to your doctor before doing anything new.

Fast forward to 2022 thank God still no joint replacement (knee)

Below is some info on poor diet and obesity is not good for Osteonecrosis. Actually obesity and poor diet cause our body to have more inflammation and that gives us more pain. And can lead to many things.

So see a nutritionist get your diet in check and if you are a compulsive overeater go to some OA meetings , see a counselor what ever it takes to reclaim your health.

I lost about 95 lbs regained 16 during covid lock down. But back on track in May 2022 I am hoping by May 2023 I am at goal weight of 145 -150 lbs. it’s not easy and the older I get ( soon to be 60) the harder it is to lose especially when you have bone and joint issues.

But trying and still no joint replacement.

If you have a problem with food like binge eating, or just an unhealthy relationship with it check out https://oa.org/

See link on study below.

Click to access 1100002678220.pdf

5 years of pics

Avascular Necrosis-Osteonecrosis Awareness Day 2021

Hard to believe another awareness day has arrived.

It’s been a struggle and challenge to get all 50 states to issue a proclamation: but being persistent is becoming rewarding. We now have about 1/2 the USA on board as 29 November being AVN-ON

To all those living with Osteonecrosis like myself, know I will not give up until every state has issued the proclamation.

We live with pain and uncertainty every day. But I assure you I will not give up until it’s recognized in every state.

Happy AVN-ON Awareness Day.

Wish you all a pain free day

Avascular Necrosis Mask

Many requested masks as so many cannot find them , so I contacted a local shop in my area and we made these two designs. The mask are washable

I don’t get paid anything for or a portion of the masks just doing this as a way to help those wearing a mask support the cause of Osteonecrosis aka Avascular Necrosis.

If you wish to purchase here is info. And they ship worldwide

They are closed on Sundays and Holidays

Afterburner FX

3600 Schotten Road

Hubbard Ohio 44425

3305347653 phone

Afterburner FX

Mask design

@Debla2020

Thank You Arizona

The good news keeps rolling in

Rare Disease Day is February 29 usually 28 on non leap years.

So as you know I have been working very hard on November 29 being National – Avascular Necrosis Osteonecrosis awareness day and all states have come on board so far but still waiting to hear from maybe 10 states.

They are doing all they can. And I am so pleased many states have issues proclamations for November 29 and many still are in the process.

Today The State of Arizona sent a proclamation for rare disease awareness we got the entire week February 20-27

And they will also be recognizing November 29

So blessed.

Hard work pays off

Thank you State of Arizona

Deb Andio

Founder Avascular Necrosis Osteonecrosis Support Int’l

#Osteonecrisis #AvascularNecrosis

Radionuclide bone scan to diagnose or confirm Avascular Necrosis-Osteonecrosis

Radionuclide bone scan. This nuclear imaging technique uses a very small amount of radioactive material, which is injected into the blood to be detected by a scanner. This test shows blood flow to the bone and cell activity within the bone.

Overview

A bone scan is a nuclear imaging test that helps diagnose and track several types of bone disease. Your doctor may order a bone scan if you have unexplained skeletal pain, a bone infection or a bone injury that can’t be seen on a standard X-ray.

Why it’s done

Images of bone scans depicting hot spots

Hot spots

If you have unexplained bone pain, a bone scan might help determine the cause. The test is very sensitive to any difference in bone metabolism. The ability to scan the entire skeleton makes a bone scan very helpful in diagnosing a wide range of bone disorders, including:

Fractures

Arthritis

Paget’s disease of bone

Cancer originating in bone

Cancer that has metastasized to bone from a different site

Infection of the joints, joint replacements or bones (osteomyelitis)

Impaired blood supply to bones or death of bone tissue (avascular necrosis)

Thank You Iowa

Hi I’m Deborah Andio the founder of Avascular Necrosis Osteonecrosis Support Int’l and I am honored and proud to say another state is on board recognizing Avascular Necrosis -Osteonecrosis

A great big thank you to Governer Kim Reynolds the Governor of the state of Iowa for not just recognizing Avascular Necrosis Osteonecrosis as Rare but issuing the proclamation for Rare Disease Month in February 2020 and also Honoring and sending a proclamation for Avascular Necrosis Osteonecrosis day November29.

Another Day Another Victory

Awareness has been good many are responding making Avascular Necrosis Osteonecrosis Awareness Day one step closer to national awareness

Thanks to

Congressman Tim Ryan  Ohio who sent me this today

And thanks again to

Mayor Jamael Tito Brown – Youngstown Ohio

And

Senator Mike Rulli – Ohio

Who sent me awareness proclamations last week.

Its happening one state at a time.

I just heard from 10 states that they also will be supply this.

Life is always good but this week have been fantastic

Scroll on other posts to see other proclamations

 

 

Link to eBooklet   Avascular Necrosis Booklet by Deborah L. Andio

Thank You Proud Moment

Thank you to Youngstown Ohio Mayor Jamael Tito Brown and Senator Michael Rulli and Senate President Larry Obhof

What an honor

Help me raise awareness today and please like and share this post.

Thank You.

1st annual

#AvascularNecrosis #Osteonecrosis

#AwarenessDay #November29

AvascularNecrosis/Osteonecrosis Support Int’l

https://www.vindy.com/news/local-news/2019/11/city-state-recognize-poland-woman-with-rare-disease/

Is Your Hip Pain The Sign of a Rare Condition?

Your hips are largest and most powerful of muscle groups—the glutes, quads, and hamstrings—all connect at the hips, and they allow you to walk, run, climb. The hip joint is crucial to all movement, in sports and day-to-day life, which is why persistent hip pain can be such a pain in the ass literally and often debilitating.

hip

 

Wear and tear on your hip joint can worsen with age. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 7 percent of adults in the U.S. suffer from hip pain, the third most common joint pain behind shoulder pain, at 9 percent, and knee pain, at 18 percent. There’s also a growing prevalence of young athletes with hip injuries, especially young women, due to repetitive overuse and acute trauma.

Trauma can sometimes lead to osteonecrosis  in any joint but we are focusing on the hip , and some of the medications given to help inflammation and strengthen bones can also be a cause of osteonecrosis aka avascular necrosis.

Your Hip Pain May be the Sign of a Rare Condition

If you have hip pain don’t always brush it off as arthritis, if it persists, get it checked out to be safe

Persistent or worsening hip pain warrants a visit to your health care provider and possibly a sports medicine specialist or ortho. Some problems, particularly hip stress fractures, are commonly misdiagnosed due to the confusing presentation of symptoms.

 

A thorough evaluation is necessary and often includes X-rays and other studies, such as an MRI or bone scan. As with all injuries, the absence of pain does not mean that all is well. Strength and flexibility deficits must be addressed to allow a healthy return to helping your quality of life.

 

 

Although a person may not initially experience symptoms, hip pain is usually the first indicator. The earlier the diagnosis is achieved, the better the patient’s potential outcome. AVN has four stages that can progress over a period of several months to more than a year. In Stage I, the hip is healthy; in Stage II, the patient experiences mild to moderate pain in direct proportion to the deterioration of the head of the femur (or ball of the hip joint). By Stage III, usually the patient will find it difficult to stand and bear weight on the hip, and joint movement will be painful. During this stage, the ball of the hip has deteriorated to what is called a subchondral fracture and early collapse. Stage IV is a full collapse of the femoral head and degenerative joint disease (DJD).

 

Treatment for AVN is recommended based on the stage of the disease coupled with the age of the patient. In Stage I, medication and crutches may be prescribed to provide relief and enable the bone to heal on its own. This treatment may require the patient to be non-weight-bearing for up to six months. It also has a failure rate greater than 80-percent.

On the horizon treatments are stem cell.

 

Surgical treatment is recommended with a Stage II diagnosis, or very early in a Stage III diagnosis. A procedure, known as a core decompression, typically involves drilling one large hole in the core of the effected bone, with or without a bone graft, to reduced pressure and improve blood circulation in the hip. Another surgical option is the vascularized fibular graft, which takes a healthy piece of bone from the fibula, along with the artery or vein, and transplants and reattaches it into the hip, to help healthy bone grow. Recovery can take several months.

 

Because most patients are diagnosed in late Stage III or IV of the disease, when the bone quality of the femoral head is poor (subchondral fracture) or has collapsed, total hip replacement is the most successful treatment for AVN. This procedure replaces the damaged bone with artificial parts. Recovery takes about eight to twelve weeks. If left untreated, AVN progresses and results in pain and severe debilitating osteoarthritis.

Treatment decisions for AVN are ultimately up to the patient and are based on his or her lifestyle and goals. If you are suffering with hip pain, talk with your primary care doctor about a referral to an orthopedic surgeon